15mm Norse Irish Figures AVAILABLE NOW!


NORSE IRISH 842 AD-1300 AD

Up to the 9th Century Celtic Ireland was merely a geographic expression, there was no organized kingdom of any sort, there were no towns or roads to speak of and all Irish society was based solely on family and clan ties. It was a land divided in kingships, ruled by rival chieftains who constantly fight each other. From 800 Vikings begun raiding an Ireland that had no central political organization whatsoever and in military terms the Irish were absolutely outclassed: they do not have the organization nor the heavy weapons and armour the Scandinavian possessed and above all they have nothing even remotely comparable to Norse warships. Within a generation from the first attacks the Viking were already settling down into military encampments at the mouth of all the critical river systems. They established bases that will grow into the cities of Limerick, Waterford, Wexford, Cork and Dublin, and in these towns most Norse colonists intermarried with native Gaels and adopted the Gaelic language as well as many Gaelic customs. Many left their original worship of Norse gods and converted to Christianity, introduced in Ireland as early as the late fourth century. Gaelicised Scandinavians dominated region of the Irish Sea until the Norman era of the twelfth century. they founded long-lasting kingdoms, such as the Kingdoms of Man, Argyll, Dublin, Galloway and western Scotland, as well as taking control of the Norse colony at York. Nowadays they are often referred to as Hiberno-Norse, Norse-Gaels or Gael Gaedhil but they called themselves Ostmen or Austmenn (East-men), a name preserved in a corrupted form in the Dublin area known as Oxmantown which is derived from Austmanna-tún (Homestead of the Eastmen). In contrast, they called the Irish Vestmenn (West-men).
This range has been sculpted by M. Campagna and C. Berni. It already covers all core troops.

Separate horses are provided at random out of a dozen different poses to maximize variation!
Confused about who were the Norse Irish? Find out more in this video! Who were the Normans?






Code: GAE1
15mm Norse Irish Command

In the heroic tradition opposite leaders, cheftains and champions called one another out in single combats to settle old grudges and garner personal fame and glory. They would be accompanied by the best armed and most valorous warriors.

Pack of 5 foot + 1 mounted figures (three different foot poses): EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!



GAE1 - 15mm Norse Irish Command
Figures sculpted by M. Campagna
Samples painted by C. Berni


Code:GAE2
Irish Noble warriors (8 foot figures in 4 poses with heavy spear)

Warriors played a predominant role in medieval Irish society, from protecting the king and borders to the occasional raid of other túatha. Due to the high cost of being a warrior, many were of the noble class. Noble children learned the warrior way through fosterage and joining a fían before taking their place in the túath.

Pack of 8 foot figures (four different poses): EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!



GAE2 - Irish Noble warriors
Figures sculpted by M. Campagna
Samples painted by C. Berni


Code:GAE3
Irish Kerns (8 foot figures in 4 poses with light equipment)

Kerns were Gaelic light infantrymen, the ordinary Medieval Irish foot soldiers, made up partly of mercenaries "bonnachts" (maintained by the various nobles) and partly of free peasantry called out to fight. The word is an anglicisation of the Middle Irish word ceithern or ceithrenn meaning a collection of persons, particularly fighting men. An individual member is a ceithernach.

Pack of 8 foot figures (four different poses): EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!




Figures sculpted by M. Campagna
Samples painted by C. Berni


Code:GAE4
Irish Bonnachts (8 foot figures in 4 poses charging with spear or axe)

All billeted troops, regardless of their arms and equipment, were referred to as Bonnachts. Thus, contrary to popular belief, there was no distinct type of soldier in medieval Ireland known as a 'bonnacht.' Dr. Gerald A. Hayes-McCoy -- the "father" of modern Irish military history -- wrote: "Bonnachts were not a distinct class of warriors; they were merely billeted men."

Pack of 8 foot figures (four different poses: EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!




Figures sculpted by C. Berni
Painted samples coming soon


Code:GAE5
Irish "Sons of Death" (8 foot figures in 4 poses charging with sword or axe)

The "Sons of Death" that are first mentioned in the Irish Annals in the 9th century were originally raised from renegades and outlaws, but were later recruited from Irish boys and raised by Norsemen. They were exceptionally fierce fighters but hated and despised for their cruelty by the rest of the Irish. They were used by Brian Boru to raid England and were wiped out at Clontarf in 1014.

Pack of 8 foot figures (four different poses: EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!




Figures sculpted by C. Berni
Painted samples coming soon


Code: VIK6
15mm Armoured Ostmen or Gael Gaedhil

Ostmen were townsmen from Viking colonies on the Irish coast, such as Dublin. Gall Gaedhil were mercenaries from the Hebrides.


Pack of 8 figures (four different poses): EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!


Figures sculpted by M. Campagna
Samples painted by M. Boetti


Code: VIK7
15mm Ostmen or Gael Gaedhil with 2 handed Axes

Despite appearances the "Danish Axe" of up to 1.5 metres in length, was a weapon of complex construction which resulted in a lively and quick weapon with devastating cutting ability. Wielded in two hands with a swing could behead horses with one stroke. Historical accounts invariably depict the Danish Axe as the weapon of the warrior elite.


Pack of 8 figures (four different poses): EURO€ 4.90
Quantity:

All figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!


Figures sculpted by M. Campagna
Samples painted by M. Boetti

Click for a larger picture!

15mm Norse Irish army for DBA 3.0

Code: DBAIII-46

Everything you need for a DBA 3.0 NORSE IRISH army!
This DBA army pack contains at least 49 figures of which 46 are on foot and 3 (well ok, 4 including the commander if you really want to be picky!) mounted.
Include enough figures for most common options: 1x 4Ax Gen, 2x 4Ax, 5x 3Ax, 3x 4Bd, 1x 3Wb or 4Bd, 1x 2LH or 3Cv and 2x 2Ps (15 elements in all) plus 2 tent models, accessories and figures to use as camp!


DBA 3.0 III/46 - NORSE IRISH 642-1300 AD
47 figures (15 elements) + camp army Pack: EURO€ 43.00

(regular price EURO 47.70 SAVE 10%!)
Quantity:
All our figures do not contain lead and are sold unpainted!



Code: 15GOT
This tent represent a temporary shelter and is designed to be suitable for any ancient nordic army. The model is about 38mm wide, 42mm deep and 22mm tall.

15GOT is also available as a finished DBM baggage element, painted, based and flocked, ready to play! You can order them here.
More info on this tent model are available here!
Plain cast: EURO€ 3.50
Quantity:


15GOT temporary shelter




Code: 15ASX
15mm Geteld

These tents were used in all Europe from the 11th Century onward and therefore are quite suitable for most nations and armies of that period. Our model is scaled for 15mm figures and will fit on a standard 40x40mm DBM baggage base.

15ASX is also available as a finished DBM baggage element, painted, based and flocked, ready to play! You can order them here.
More info on this tent model are available here!
Plain cast: EURO€ 3.50
Quantity:





15ASX - 15mm Geteld tent

Logistics

For detailing your Norse Irish camp and baggage scenes we suggest to use
Code LGS2, Code LGS3, Code LGS5,Code LGS6 and Code LGS8